Poison Ivy & Harley Quinn

Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn - Batman BW 1

Poison Ivy and Harley Quinn - Batman BW 1

From Batman Black and White #1, Nov 2013


Alex Ross - Classic Batmobile

Batmobile by Alex Ross

More Batmobiles


Neal Adams

Neal Adams Monster Dracula Frankenstein

More Neal Adams


Harley Quinn by Dan Panosian

Harley Quinn by Dan Panosian

More Harley Quinn


The Neal Adams Revolution

Neal Adams Cover BLock

"30 DAY DC COMICS CHALLENGE Day 8: Favourite Artist?

Neal Adams changed the look of the comic industry forever. Adams had a strong background in the field of comic strips before he made the move to comic books in the late 1960s. By applying techniques and production philosophies of the commercial art world, he spawned a generation of imitators and a radical shift in style. I would almost go as far to say that comics history could rightfully be divided into the Kirby era and the Adams era.

Although his career has been spotty in the years since, his impact in the late 60’s is unparalleled, and the repercussions of his influence are still in evidence today. The above covers alone give an indication of how impactful he was not only within DC comics history, but comics history in general."

This is from the Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut tumblr site.

The "least favorite character - Batman" article is funny.


Catwoman #27

Catwoman Gothtopia 27 cover


Leonard Nimoy dies

SPock Lenoard Nimoy

Lenoard Nimoy, famous as Spock on the TV show and movie versions of Star Trek, died of advanced pulmonary disease in Los Angeles. Nimoy was born in Boston on March 26, 1931. Spock Lenoard Nimoy Mad Magazine

I am Not SPock


Wolverine cover issue 18 variant

Wolverine cover issue 18 variant


Batman - Revenge of the Dark Knight

Batman - Revenge of the Dark Knight

Diego Riselli artwork - online web page here


Joker and Wonder Woman

Joker and Wonder Woman by Joshua Middleton

Joker and Wonder Woman by Joshua Middleton


Alex Garner art - X-Men

Alex Garner Jean Grey and X-Men

More Alex Garner art


Spider-Man and Gwen Stacy

Spider Man Gwen Stacy

Spider-Man and Gwen Stacy - Art by Vincent Illustration - online page here


"How Superhero Movies Lost Their Humanity"

Pining for the days of Sam Raimi, Sujay Kumar at Daily Beast analyzes why the current crop of superhero movies don't measure up to past cinema:

"Spider-Man 2 opens and closes with those blue eyes. They belong to Mary Jane Watson, the girl Peter Parker wants but can’t have, because superheroes don’t have time for that. Between these shots the camera spins from train tops to minivans to montages set to “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head.” The movie is never about bombs or bluster or universe-building. It’s about a boy who loves a girl.

...For much of the movie Spider-Man isn’t even in costume—like when an unmasked Peter stops a runaway train with his back, the weight of the world pushing down on him. Spider-Man 2 isn’t without flaws—James Franco doesn’t have much to do but gel his hair—yet it’s arguably the best superhero film in the genre’s short history.

Eleven years later, what went wrong with the superhero movie?

“It’s become convoluted corporate destinies,” Miles Millar told me. He and Alfred Gough wrote Spider-Man 2’s story (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay author Michael Chabon is also credited, with a fraction of his draft making it to the film). “Instead of a compelling movie, something which is complete within itself, other agendas are at play, which makes these movies feel less like movies and more like TV shows or product placement for toys. They’ve literally become not about finding the dramatic core or the emotional stake for the characters.”


Spider-Man and X-Men

X-Men and SPider-Man


Batman and Robin - Bruno Oliveira

Batman and Robin - Bruno Oliveira

Bruno Oliveira artwork - online web page here


Human Torch vs Sub-Mariner

Human Torch battling the Sub-Mariner

The Human Torch battling the Sub-Mariner - art by Michael Komarck


Mr. Fantastic vs The Invisible Woman

Mr. Fantastic vs The Invisible Woman by Leinil Yu

Mr. Fantastic vs The Invisible Woman - art by Leinil Yu


Invisible Woman vs Sub Mariner

Invisible Woman vs Sub Mariner


Fantastic Four #245

John Byrne - Fantastic Four 245 cover art

John Byrne cover art - More John Byrne


Fantastic Four

Arthur Adams

Arthur Adams art


Arthur Adams Batman

Arthur Adams Batman


Arthur Adams & Tony Daniel Deadpool

Arthur Adams and Tony Daniel - Deadpool


Jae Lee art - Catwoman and Superman

Jeae Lee art  - Superman and Catwoman


Wonder Woman by Travis Charest

Wonder Woman by Travis Charest


Little Lulu 1953

Little Lulu 1953


Matt Baker Cover Art, 1948

Phantom Lady 18 Cover Matt Baker

Phantom Lady #18, April 1948


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Lynda Carter - Wonder Woman

Lynda Carter - Wonder Woman

Lynda Carter - Wonder Woman


Dana Kaminski Super Mario Bros